Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
cellular neutral network (Download Full Report And Abstract)
Post: #1


Cellular Neural Network is a revolutionary concept and an experimentally proven new computing paradigm for analog computers. Looking at the technological advancement in the last 50 years ; we see the first revolution which led to pc industry in 1980â„¢s, second revolution led to internet industry in 1990â„¢s cheap sensors & mems arrays in desired forms of artificial eyes, nose, ears etc. this third revolution owes due to C.N.N.This technology is implemented using CNN-UM and is also used in imageprocessing.It can also implement any Boolean functions.


A standard CNN architecture consists of an m*n rectangular array of cells c(i,j) with Cartesian coordinates (i,j) i=1,2¦..M, j=12¦...N.

A class -1 m*n standard CNN is defined by a m*n rectangular array of cells cij located at site (i,j) i= 1,2 ¦¦.m ,j=1,2,¦.n is defined mathematically by

(dXij/dt )= -Xij + A(I,j,k,l) Ykl + B(i,j,k,l) + Zij


Voltage controlled current sources impliment various coupling terms. These transconductances can be easily constructed on CMOS integrated circuits

Local rules
1. White pixel- white, independent of neighbours
2. Black pixel- white , if all nearest neighbours are black
3. Black pixel- black , if at least one nearest neighbour is white
4. Black, gray or white pixel-gray if nearest neighbours are gray


Recently a novel structure has been introduced to implement any Boolean / gray level function of any number of variables .The output is no longer restricted to be binary so that CNNs with gray scale outputs are obtained. Simplical CNNs are implemented using RTDs (resonant tunneling diodes)

A simplical partition is used to subdivide the domain in to convex regions called simplices which are the natural extension 2-d triangle into an n-d space the corners of these simplices are called vertices & for the particular chosen domain are the points of the form ( +1,-1,+1,-1) it was proven that the set of all PWL function f is a linear vector space. Every PWL function can be expressed as a linear combination

Download Full Report And Abstract
Post: #2
Network Introduction
A computer network allows sharing of resources and information among interconnected devices. In the 1960s, the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) started funding the design of the Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET) for the United States Department of Defense. It was the first computer network in the world Development of the network began in 1969, based on designs developed during the 1960s.
Computer networks can be used for several purposes:
• Facilitating communications. Using a network, people can communicate efficiently and easily via email, instant messaging, chat rooms, telephone, video telephone calls, and video conferencing.
• Sharing hardware. In a networked environment, each computer on a network may access and use hardware resources on the network, such as printing a document on a shared network printer.
• Sharing files, data, and information. In a network environment, authorized user may access data and information stored on other computers on the network. The capability of providing access to data and information on shared storage devices is an important feature of many networks.
• Sharing software. Users connected to a network may run application programs on remote computers.
• Information preservation.
• Security.
• Speed up.

Network classification
The following list presents categories used for classifying networks.
Connection method
Computer networks can be classified according to the hardware and software technology that is used to interconnect the individual devices in the network, such as optical fiber, Ethernet, wireless LAN, Home PNA, power line communication or
Ethernet uses physical wiring to connect devices. Frequently deployed devices include hubs, switches, bridges, or routers. Wireless LAN technology is designed to connect devices without wiring. These devices use radio waves or infrared signals as a transmission medium. ITU-T technology uses existing home wiring (coaxial cable, phone lines and power lines) to create a high-speed (up to 1 Gigabit/s) local area network.
Wired technologies
• Twisted pair wire is the most widely used medium for telecommunication. Twisted-pair wires are ordinary telephone wires which consist of two insulated copper wires twisted into pairs and are used for both voice and data transmission. The use of two wires twisted together helps to reduce crosstalk and electromagnetic induction. The transmission speed ranges from 2 million bits per second to 100 million bits per second.
• Coaxial cable is widely used for cable television systems, office buildings, and other worksites for local area networks. The cables consist of copper or aluminum wire wrapped with insulating layer typically of a flexible material with a high dielectric constant, all of which are surrounded by a conductive layer. The layers of insulation help minimize interference and distortion. Transmission speed range from 200 million to more than 500 million bits per second.
• Optical fiber cable consists of one or more filaments of glass fiber wrapped in protective layers. It transmits light which can travel over extended distances. Fiber-optic cables are not affected by electromagnetic radiation. Transmission speed may reach trillions of bits per second. The transmission speed of fiber optics is hundreds of times faster than for coaxial cables and thousands of times faster than a twisted-pair wire.[citation needed]
Wireless technologies
• Terrestrial microwave – Terrestrial microwaves use Earth-based transmitter and receiver. The equipment look similar to satellite dishes. Terrestrial microwaves use low-gigahertz range, which limits all communications to line-of-sight. Path between relay stations spaced approx, 30 miles apart. Microwave antennas are usually placed on top of buildings, towers, hills, and mountain peaks.
• Communications satellites – The satellites use microwave radio as their telecommunications medium which are not deflected by the Earth's atmosphere. The satellites are stationed in space, typically 22,000 miles (for geosynchronous satellites) above the equator. These Earth-orbiting systems are capable of receiving and relaying voice, data, and TV signals.
• Cellular and PCS systems – Use several radio communications technologies. The systems are divided to different geographic areas. Each area has a low-power transmitter or radio relay antenna device to relay calls from one area to the next area.
• Wireless LANs – Wireless local area network use a high-frequency radio technology similar to digital cellular and a low-frequency radio technology. Wireless LANs use spread spectrum technology to enable communication between multiple devices in a limited area. An example of open-standards wireless radio-wave technology is IEEE.
• Infrared communication , which can transmit signals between devices within small distances not more than 10 meters peer to peer or (face to face) without anybody in the line of transmitting.
Networks are often classified as
Local area network (LAN),
Wide area network (WAN),
Metropolitan area network (MAN),
Personal area network (PAN),
Virtual private network (VPN),
Campus area network (CAN),
Storage area network (SAN), and others, depending on their scale, scope and purpose
Controller area network (CAN) usage,
trust level, and access right often differ between these types of networks. LANs tend to be designed for internal use by an organization's internal systems and employees in individual physical locations, such as a building, while WANs may connect physically separate parts of an organization and may include connections to third parties.
Functional relationship (network architecture)
Computer networks may be classified according to the functional relationships which exist among the elements of the network, e.g., active networking, client–server and peer-to-peer (workgroup) architecture.
Network topology
Computer networks may be classified according to the network topology upon which the network is based, such as bus network, star network, ring network, mesh network. Network topology is the coordination by which devices in the network are arranged in their logical relations to one another, independent of physical arrangement. Even if networked computers are physically placed in a linear arrangement and are connected to a hub, the network has a star topology, rather than a bus topology. In this regard the visual and operational characteristics of a network are distinct. Networks may be classified based on the method of data used to convey the data; these include digital and analog networks.

Types of networks based on physical scope
Common types of computer networks may be identified by their scale.
Local area network
A local area network (LAN) is a network that connects computers and devices in a limited geographical area such as home, school, computer laboratory, office building, or closely positioned group of buildings. Each computer or device on the network is a node. Current wired LANs are most likely to be based on Ethernet technology, although new standards like ITU-T also provide a way to create a wired LAN using existing home wires (coaxial cables, phone lines and power lines)

As larger universities and research labs obtained more computers during the late 1960s, there was an increasing pressure to provide high-speed interconnections. A report in 1970 from the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory detailing the growth of their "Octopus" network gives a good indication of the situation.
Cambridge Ring was developed at Cambridge University in 1974 but was never developed into a successful commercial product.
Ethernet was developed at Xerox PARC in 1973–1975, and filed as U.S. Patent 4,063,220. In 1976, after the system was deployed at PARC, Metcalfe and Boggs published their seminal paper, "Ethernet: Distributed Packet-Switching For Local Computer Networks."
ARCNET was developed by Data point Corporation in 1976 and announced in 1977. It had the first commercial installation in December 1977 at Chase Manhattan Bank in New York.
Standards evolution
The development and proliferation of CP/M-based personal computers from the late 1970s and then DOS-based personal computers from 1981 meant that a single site began to have dozens or even hundreds of computers. The initial attraction of networking these was generally to share disk space and laser printers, which were both very expensive at the time. There was much enthusiasm for the concept and for several years, from about 1983 onward, computer industry pundits would regularly declare the coming year to be “the year of the LAN”.
In practice, the concept was marred by proliferation of incompatible physical Layer and network protocol implementations, and a plethora of methods of sharing resources. Typically, each vendor would have its own type of network card, cabling, protocol, and network operating system. A solution appeared with the advent of Novell NetWare which provided even-handed support for dozens of competing card/cable types, and a much more sophisticated operating system than most of its competitors. Netware dominated the personal computer LAN business from early after its introduction in 1983 until the mid 1990s when Microsoft introduced Windows NT Advanced Server and Windows for Workgroups.
Of the competitors to NetWare, only Banyan Vines had comparable technical strengths, but Banyan never gained a secure base. Microsoft and 3Com worked together to create a simple network operating system which formed the base of 3Com's 3+Share, Microsoft's LAN Manager and IBM's LAN Server - but none of these were particularly successful.
During the same period, Unix computer workstations from vendors such as Sun Microsystems, Hewlett-Packard, Silicon Graphics, Intergraph, NeXT and Apollo were using TCP/IP based networking. Although this market segment is now much reduced, the technologies developed in this area continue to be influential on the Internet and in both Linux and Apple Mac OS X networking—and the TCP/IP protocol has now almost completely replaced IPX, AppleTalk, NBF, and other protocols used by the early PC LANs

Personal area network
A personal area network (PAN) is a computer network used for communication among computer and different information technological devices close to one person. Some examples of devices that are used in a PAN are personal computers, printers, fax machines, telephones, PDAs, scanners, and even video game consoles. A PAN may include wired and wireless devices. The reach of a PAN typically extends to 10 meters.A wired PAN is usually constructed with USB and Firewire connections while technologies such as Bluetooth and infrared communication typically form a wireless PAN.
A Bluetooth PAN is also called a piconet, and is composed of up to 8 active devices in a master-slave relationship (a very large number of devices can be connected in "parked" mode). The first Bluetooth device in the piconet is the master, and all other devices are slaves that communicate with the master. A piconet typically has a range of 10 meters, although ranges of up to 100 meters can be reached under ideal circumstances.
Recent innovations in Bluetooth antennas have allowed these devices to greatly exceed the range for which they were originally designed. At DEF CON 12, a group of hackers known as "Flexilis" successfully connected two Bluetooth devices more than half a mile (800 m) away. They used an antenna with a scope and Yagi antenna, all attached to a rifle stock. A cable attached the antenna to a Bluetooth card in a computer. They later named the antenna "The BlueSniper."
Skinplex, another PAN technology, transmits via the capacitive near field of human skin. Skinplex can detect and communicate up to one meter from a human body. It is already used for access control for door locks and jamming protection in convertible car roofs.

Important Note..!

If you are not satisfied with above reply ,..Please


So that we will collect data for you and will made reply to the request....OR try below "QUICK REPLY" box to add a reply to this page
Popular Searches: methods of neutral grounding in power systems ppt, cellular neural network powerpoint, neutral grounding resistor application ppt, abstract for cellular phones project, neutral point clamped multilevel inverter ppt, ppto full, cellular and wireless,

Quick Reply
Type your reply to this message here.

Image Verification
Image Verification
(case insensitive)
Please enter the text within the image on the left in to the text box below. This process is used to prevent automated posts.

Possibly Related Threads...
Thread: Author Replies: Views: Last Post
  imouse full report computer science technology 3 3,636 17-06-2016 12:16 PM
Last Post: ashwiniashok
  computer networks full report seminar topics 7 4,906 25-05-2016 02:07 PM
Last Post: dhanyavp
  Implementation of RSA Algorithm Using Client-Server full report seminar topics 6 5,002 10-05-2016 12:21 PM
Last Post: dhanyavp
  Optical Computer Full Seminar Report Download computer science crazy 43 34,290 29-04-2016 09:16 AM
Last Post: dhanyavp
Lightbulb Virtual Laser Keyboards (Download PPT,Abstract,Report) computer science crazy 493 104,787 28-03-2016 04:10 AM
Last Post: zotufalist
  ethical hacking full report computer science technology 41 46,794 18-03-2016 04:51 PM
Last Post: seminar report asees
  broadband mobile full report project topics 7 2,108 27-02-2016 12:32 PM
Last Post: Prupleannuani
  steganography full report project report tiger 15 19,490 11-02-2016 02:02 PM
Last Post: seminar report asees
  Digital Signature Full Seminar Report Download computer science crazy 20 14,054 16-09-2015 02:51 PM
Last Post: seminar report asees
  Steganography In Images (Download Seminar Report) Computer Science Clay 16 15,168 08-06-2015 03:26 PM
Last Post: seminar report asees